Three points, Ann.

First, go to r-word.org and educate yourself.

Second, what point do we have to get to in order for people to start treating others with respect? Everyone wants freedom and basic human rights, correct? Respect should be included. You treat others with respect and you will be respected. Respect their freedoms, and yours will be respected as well. I don’t care about which “side” your political opinions fall on, EVERYONE deserves to be respected.

Third, the first person in any debate/argument/expression of opinions to resort to personal insults is always the loser.

Better off today than four years ago?

This is the current “trending” political question.
Here’s my answer: absolutely yes.
Here’s why: I came to the realization that I control my life and my status. I, through hard, dedicated, smart work, set myself up for success. And while government does play a role in setting boundaries in an attempt to create a level playing field for all of us citizens, I’m still ultimately responsible for setting my limits.
There are millions of choices we’re faced with but, the decisions are ultimately up to us. Don’t like something? Change it. Like something? Do more of it. It’s that simple. No, really. It is.
Let’s stop blaming politicians and government for the status of our lives.

On Due Process…

“Innocent until proven guilty” is the single most important aspect of our justice system. It’s one of the reasons that we, as US citizens, enjoy the freedoms that we have. It’s protection of our rights, for guilty and innocent alike.
We make assumptions all the time. Sometimes our assumptions are no-brainers, sometimes they’re murkier. But, it’s still important that, no matter our assumptions, we do treat everyone with the same “innocent until proven guilty” philosophy. Otherwise, what would be the point of having our justice system at all? Why not just have flash mobs getting ropes and hanging people from trees based on their assumptions? 

All that aside, please read +Rick Stilwell‘s comment, as I feel that is the bigger picture. We’re (too often) focused on the wrong things.

I wrote the above in response to a comment asking why we’re calling the Aurora shooter “alleged” and “suspect” even though the general consensus agrees that he is guilty.
I’m a strong believer in Due Process. It’s one of the most virtuous ideals within our justice system. It guarantees that criminals be treated as human beings and challenges us to work to find truth and fact amidst clouds of misinformation, perception, and interpretations.

You can view the original Google Plus post (and comments) here.

The ridiculousness of AT&T

Five weeks ago, I received a notice from AT&T thanking me for being loyal to their U-Verse service for the past 6 months. As my “reward” I had to complete an online form so that they could send me a $10 gift card.

Today, the gift card arrived. Now, I have to go online to activate the card.

Why not just send me the card? Why do I have to request it before it’s sent? Why not just credit my account $10 and send me a “thank you” email letting me know about the credit?

It’s time we stop making things more difficult than they need to be.

Where I reveal how little I know about social media strategy

As I begin to use Google Plus more and more, I become increasingly disappointed with the lack of content provided by sources and companies I would really like to “connect” with. I have taken some initiative in reaching out to them to ask why their posts are so rare/non-existant. One of the most common answers: There’s not enough traffic on G+ to warrant activity. We post where the traffic is”.
Completely understandable. Seriously, I get it.
BUT…
Reminds me of a thought I had while sitting at a standstill, on I-405, during one of my 110 mile commutes to the office. I’m not in traffic. I am traffic.
With that in mind, wouldn’t there be an increase in traffic on Google Plus if the “content creators” were to, you know, create content? I know it’s tricky but, when you build something, you have to actually build.